All posts filed under: Inspirations

Ryan McGinley, Bearer of Light

Ryan McGinley is an american photographer living in New York who depicts the pleasure-seeking ways of the contemporary youth culture. Although the photos have a background of violence and drugs, they have a lightness, a freedom and a velocity in the movements of the subjects. Since his childhood he was interested in the marginal elements of society and used to hang out with musicians, artists and skateboarders. In 1995 he joined the Parsons School of Design in New York to study graphic design. The fine art community took notice of his work when he printed a book entitled “The Kids Are Alright” in 1999. His large-format color photographs soon graced the walls of the Whitney Museum of American Art where he was the youngest person to be given a solo exhibition. Then he started doing ad projects and assignments for Vice magazine, New York Times, US Olympic Sports Team and Levi’s. In 2007 he received the title of the “Young Photographer of the Year” at the International Center of Photography Infinity Awards. Sea inside heart, Ryan …

In Masao Yamamoto’s shadow

Masao Yamamoto born 1957 in Gamagori City in Aichi Prefecture, in Japan, is a photographer known for his small photographs, which seek to individualize the photographic prints as objects. Masao Yamamoto began his art studies as a painter, studying oil painting under Goro Saito in his native city. He presently uses photography to capture images evoking memories. He blurs the border between painting and photography by experimenting with his printing surfaces. With his subjects including still-lives, nudes, and landscapes, Masao Yamamoto’s minimalist photography takes a poetic dimension that transcends nature with a subtle game of light and shadows.

Secret Versailles by Robert Polidori

Born in Montreal in 1951, Robert Polidori is one of the world’s most acclaimed photographers of human habitats and environment. Robert Polidori moved to the United States as a child and began his career in avant-garde film, assisting Jonas Mekas at the Anthology Film Archives in New York, an experience that shaped his approach to photography. While living in Paris in the early 1980s, he began exploring the restoration of the interiors of Versailles, and has continued over a 30 year period to photograph the ongoing changes. He then returned to New York in 1997 with a show of twelve photographs from the Versailles series at Robert Miller Gallery. These series of photographs surveys the concept of historical revisionism as seen through the practice of restoration of historical landmarks. Creating large-format color film photographs, Robert Polidori’s images record a visual citation of both past history and the present times within the confines of a single frame. He captures the vestiges that evoke the essence of each setting and its particular meaning. The Versailles series introduce …

The splendour and misery of Havana by Michael Eastman

In his collection “Havana”, photographer Michael Eastman dives into the past splendor of Cuba’s capital that seem to be almost forgotten by the world. Endowed with a poetic look, Michael Eastman explores the crumbling interiors and exteriors of Havana with a touch of melancholy, adding vivid colors to create a magical and dream-like atmosphere. These colored photographs capture contemporary cuban spirit through suggestions of every day life. Decrepit buildings hide refined interiors still beautifully furnished. It gives the impression of being in the american drama movie “The Lost City” directed by Andy Garcia in 2005 with Inès Sastre and Bill Murray. This haunting homage to Havana provides an overview on the faded glory of the city. Through Michael Eastman’s explorations of architectural cuban form, this mysterious narrative about time and place is an admirable tribute to Havana. More about Michael Eastman : http://www.eastmanimages.com

Junichi Hakoyama , between shadow and light

Japanese photographer Junichi Hakoyama explores the city’s geometrical lines through a subtle display of light and shadows. This high-contrast black and white architectural imagery seems inspired by film noir atmosphere : depth and intrigue through dark images with just one dark figure denoting a dramatic scene. Junichi Hakoyama seems to find beauty in this minimalist darkness. A simple crossing becomes an artful masterpiece, a seemingly boring staircase is transformed into a sculptural form. Light and shadows are the only companion of this solitary silhouette who looks like a moving scultpure walking somewhere in the frame. More about Junichi Hakoyama : http://www.junichihakoyama.tumblr.com

Colorful aesthetics with Cru Camara

Cru Camara is a Filipino photographer born in 1994 and currently studying at School of Visual Arts in New York. Her early childhood was divided between Manila and her parents’ farm in the province where she spent her time wandering through the natural landscape. She started taking photographs in high school, following the end of her decade-long studies in classical music. Cru Camara’s work gives the chance to wonder what the story behind each photograph is. Her work leaves quite a lot to the imagination as very little elements are used to create each piece. Camara has a collection of unique photographs that capture the eye’s instantly with their fresh aesthetics that look like paintings. Her style utilizes colour and delicate clarity to produce pieces that will stand the test of time. She shoots stunning minimalist visuals, especially floral series where she plays with inversed colors and colorful neon lights. She’s very attracted to the idea of directly translating things from the real world into something that’s closer to her own expression of it. Cru Cama …

The Anastasia of Winter by Emma Summerton

Top-model Lindsey Wixson bundled up in luxe furs and ornate prints for a fashion spread featured in the December issue of Vogue Japan in 2013. The American model posed for Emma Summerton in a winter wardrobe of layered looks from the likes of Dolce & Gabbana, Duro Olowu and Louis Vuitton styled by fashion editor Giovanna Battagalia. Vogue Japan celebrated Russian culture via Lindsey Wixson’s exploration of winter-kissed landscapes and landmarks. The detailing of each look correlates with the complexity in architecture, and Lindsey herself is reminiscent of the most fashionable Matryoshka doll. Rouged cheeks courtesy of makeup artist Mathias van Hooff and teased hair by Neil Moodie gives Lindsey a doll-like look.